High School Coaches Agree-Drug Test Student-Athletes


baseball high 5

cropped-LOGO.pngWisconsin State legislators and many high school coaches want to mandate high schools to make random drug testing a requirement for student who drive to school or participate in any after school extracurricular activity.

The idea for the legislation comes out of a coalition of local leaders that assembled to tackle heroin and opioid abuse and is based on random drug testing programs that are already done by a handful of Wisconsin districts.

Only parents are told about the positive results of those students, who receive treatment options but no academic penalties such as suspension. The consequences are limited to those such as the loss of participation in a sports game that listed in the school’s code for athletics and activities.

High school coaches and parents agree that if students want to make starting linebacker or point guard for their high school, they should be prepared to pee in a cup.

With any form of drug testing —especially in high schools — it is important to approach it as an opportunity to provide treatment for a disease rather than punishment.

Legislators and high school coaches are very concerned about young adults abusing opiates but weren’t convinced randomly testing students in sports and other activities was the right approach. It may end up looking like a feel good win but…it’s not going to fix everything.

Coaches are very concerned about their student-athletes abusing opiates but wasn’t convinced randomly testing students in sports and other activities was the right approach.

The idea for the legislation comes out of a coalition of local leaders assembled to tackle heroin and opioid abuse and is based on random drug testing programs that are already done by a handful of Wisconsin districts.

Last year, the Oconomowoc Area School District started randomly testing its middle and high school students who play sports, do other after school activities or leave their car in the school parking lot. The move followed the overdose deaths of former students, Superintendent Roger Rindo said.

“We got tired of burying kids,” he said.

paul@coachessportscenter.com

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April 21, 2017